Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to learn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More

 

“Hora tras Hora, Día tras Día”, de Rosalía de Castro

Another poem by Rosalía de Castro, this wistful piece uses images of nature to describe the passing of time. Like most of Castro’s poems, it is tinged with a sense of loss. Read More

Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to learn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More

School Trip to Spain: Andalusia and El Puerto de Santa Maria
Norwich School June 2017

A group of year 8’s from Norwich School came to visit us in El Puerto de Santa María in June as a school trip to Spain. They all stayed in our lovely Spark residence during their time with us, participated in many activities and excursions planned by us, experienced Spanish culture and practised using Spanish too!  Read more!

Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to learn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More

Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to learn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More

“Madrigal”, de Gutierre de Cetina

This sixteenth century poem is one of the most famous Spanish poems ever. Written by former soldier Gutierre de Cetina, it seems to be a traditional love poem, describing “clear and serene eyes” — but they look at him so angrily that it doesn’t seem like their owner returns the poet’s affections!

Ojos claros, serenos,
si de un dulce mirar sois alabados,
¿por qué, si me miráis, miráis airados?
Si cuanto más piadosos,
más bellos parecéis a aquel que os mira,
no me miréis con ira,
porque no parezcáis menos hermosos.
¡Ay tormentos rabiosos!
Ojos claros, serenos,
ya que así me miráis, miradme al menos.

Join us next Wednesday for another classic Spanish poem!

Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to dlearn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More

“Soneto a Lisi”, de Francisco de Quevedo

By the same poet who wrote “A una nariz”, this exquisite sonnet explores both love and death, and how true love can  survive even death. In the last line, the poet claims that the remains of his dead body will continue to love: “dust they will be, but dust in love”. Do you find this romantic or a little creepy? Read More

Start the week with a Spanish joke!

Jokes are a fun way to learn more about how a language works, as many of them rely on the subtleties of words and wordplay. This teaches students more about how to use the language, as well as hopefully raising a smile. Why not read a joke out in class and see who can translate it first? Read More